Casey Calhoun, Ph.D.

Casey Dean Calhoun, Ph.D.
Accepting New Patients

Accepting New Patients

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New Patients

843-792-9162 843-792-9162

Returning Patients

843-792-9162 843-792-9162

Degree Ph.D.
School University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Specialties
  • Psychiatry
Clinical Interests
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder)
  • Young children with behavior problems
  • Child and adolescent therapy
  • Family therapy
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)
Accepts New Patients Yes

New Patients

843-792-9162 843-792-9162

Returning Patients

843-792-9162 843-792-9162

Locations

Institute of Psychiatry
67 President Street
Charleston, SC 29425
Map & Directions
 

Biography

Dr. Casey Calhoun is a licensed clinical psychologist and assistant professor at the MUSC National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He received his doctorate (Ph.D.) in clinical psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, completed his clinical internship at the Charleston Consortium Clinical Psychology Internship Program, and completed his postdoctoral fellowship at the NCVC.

In his clinical practice, Dr. Calhoun uses the state-of-the-art, research-informed psychotherapy techniques to improve the lives of children, adolescents, and adults struggling to manage symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. In his work with youth, Dr. Calhoun adapts his treatment approach such that it considers each child’s developmental level and interests; this helps ensure that treatment is both engaging and easy to follow. His work with youth also frequently incorporates family members and considers family dynamics (e.g., relationships between parents and children) as an important component of treatment.

Dr. Calhoun’s research interests broadly center on better understanding how interactions between neurobiological, cognitive, and interpersonal processes influence one’s ability to manage significant stressors (e.g., interpersonal trauma, rejection, etc.) and risk of experiencing negative psychological outcomes (e.g., PTSD, depression, etc.). His interests are primarily considered within a developmental framework, with particular emphasis on the adolescent transition and the role of peer relationships.